In his new one-man show, On the Media host Bob Garfield grapples with questions of identity and belonging. "I've been running from the religious part of my religion for my entire adult life," he says.

(Image credit: Adam Baker/Flickr)

Owner Mark Fleischman's memoir drops plenty of celebrity names while detailing the day-to-day logistics (and the drugs) that kept the nightspot running.

(Image credit: Allan Tannenbaum/Getty Images)

Every year, the New York City Ballet asks top fashion designers to outfit its dancers for its Fall Gala. Good thing the capacity of its 18-person costume department is "the highest you can get."

(Image credit: Erin Baiano/Courtesy of New York City Ballet)

On the hit TV show, Daniels created one of the great characters of our time — the ambitious record company matriarch Cookie Lyon. So we'll see what he knows about actual cookies.

(Image credit: Ron Eshel/Invision/AP)

Battle of the Sexes tells the story of the 1973 tennis match between Bobby Riggs and Billie Jean King. The event drew an enormous audience and NPR's Bob Mondello says the movie could too.

Emma Stone stars as King in a breezy new film that carries us back to '73, and the heyday of the women's lib movement. Critic John Powers says the message of Battle of the Sexes still resonates today.

The new chapter in the spy franchise ramps up the first film's caustic, violent cynicism but leans even harder into the artifice; a reliance on soundstages and CGI dampens the excitement and energy.

(Image credit: Giles Keyte/20th Century Fox)

As summer gives way to fall, blockbusters give way to award contenders. Here are some of the best, buzziest and otherwise noteworthy films coming to theaters.

(Image credit: 61st BFI London Film Festival/ Steve Dietl, 61st BFI London Film Festival/ Melinda Sue Gordon, 2016 Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation/ Courtesy of TIFF)

Judi Dench returns to the role of Queen Victoria — this time in her dotage — for Stephen Frears' film about the monarch's eyebrow-raising friendship with a young Indian man (Ali Fazal).

(Image credit: Peter Mountain/Focus Features)

LEGO films have become their own genre, and despite stellar voice work from Justin Theroux as the evil Lord Garmadon, the genre is — surprisingly — already showing its age.

(Image credit: Warner Bros. Pictures)

The new film, starring Emma Stone and Steve Carell as the players facing off in one of the most famous tennis matches in history, shows how easy it is to paint a trailblazer into a corner.

(Image credit: 20th Century Fox)

Burns says he and co-director Lynn Novick initially thought they understood the Vietnam War. But when they started putting together their new PBS series, they realized, "We knew nothing."

(Image credit: PBS)

Shaul Schwarz's new documentary explores the complex relationship between hunters and conservationist. Critic David Edelstein praises the "tangled sympathies" Trophy elicits.

"You'd think cake would be apolitical, and yet here we are," says one of several D.C.-area pastry chefs who wrought their support for gay marriage into elaborate wedding cakes.

(Image credit: Kelly Jo Smart/NPR)

Alice McDermott's new novel immerses readers in the homely details of Irish Catholic Brooklyn in the early decades of the 20th century, but also addresses bigger, universal questions of love and life.

(Image credit: Christina Ascani/NPR)

Critic Chris Klimek says Martin Scorcese's landmark 1980 film provides an unflattering portrait of Jake Lamotta, who died Wednesday — a portrait the boxer was only too happy to sit for.

(Image credit: Keystone/Getty Images)

Eleanor Henderson's novel, set in 1930s Georgia, seeks to portray a time when "slavery was over, but not past," says our reviewer. But a lack of nuance keeps its characters from emerging as individuals.

(Image credit: Jennifer Kerrigan/NPR)

Through the Rubenstein Test Kitchen project, librarians and staff re-create historical recipes from thousands of cookbooks in the collections. Some dishes are very culturally telling ... and comical.

(Image credit: Jerry Young/Getty Images)

Director David Gordon Green's film stands out from others like it because it prizes "understanding Bauman's perspective and the private burdens of being a hero" over simple uplift.

(Image credit: Roadside Attractions)

The one-woman show centers on a Syrian-American who tells harrowing stories of Syria's civil war as she prepares a traditional dish. It's an intimate experience for both the audience and the actress.

(Image credit: Pavel Antonov /Blake Zidell & Associates)

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Museum of Northwest Art

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The Museum of Northwest Art connects people with the art, diverse cultures and environments of the Northwest. 

 

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MoNA collects and exhibits contemporary art from across the Northwest, including Alaska, British Columbia, California, Idaho, Montana, Oregon and Washington.