Curry shares the inspiration for her new series, We'll Meet Again, and reflects on the "verbal sexual harassment" she and others experienced at NBC's morning show.

(Image credit: David Turnley/PBS)

Reviewer Justin Chang says "not much happens — and yet everything seems to be at stake" in Alex Ross Perry's film about six moderately unhappy Brooklynites and the visitor who interrupts their lives.

Jenkins started out in theater and didn't get a movie role until he was in his 30s. Now 70, he's up for an Oscar for best supporting actor for his role in The Shape of Water.

The longtime game show host has described himself in the past as a political independent and has expressed interest in one day moderating a presidential debate as well.

(Image credit: Emma McIntyre/Getty Images)

The recently concluded third season of The CW's darkly hilarious musical comedy series featured 25 original songs; once again, Glen Weldon ranks them all with cool, scientific precision.

(Image credit: Greg Gayne/The CW)

Your parents' favorite travel expert has made his name as a low-key, approachable, optimistic guy. But in his new book he doesn't shy away from trouble and the ways travel makes you an outsider.

(Image credit: Nation Books)

Michael Stuhlbarg is having a breakout year in Hollywood. NPR's Ari Shapiro speaks to the actor about his year, which includes being in three of this year's Best Picture nominated films.

Black Panther broke records and crushed expectations at the box office it. Not just here in the States, but in foreign markets too. That performance, as well as the one by Get Out, can finally put to rest the notion that movies with black actors don't do well internationally.

Smith's massive new essay collection covers a wide assortment of topics, but critic Maureen Corrigan says Feel Free is strongest when it focuses on art and identity.

(Image credit: Eslah Attar/NPR)

Growing up, Tara Westover had no birth certificate, never saw a doctor and didn't go to school. She writes about her awkward transition into the mainstream in Educated: A Memoir.

(Image credit: Paul Stuart /Random House)

This new essay, edited by Ernest Drucker, argues that mass incarceration — more than 2 million Americans are locked up — tears at our social fabric and leaves people with no option but to reoffend.

(Image credit: Eslah Attar/NPR)

NPR's Audie Cornish talks to Greta Gerwig, the Oscar-nominated director of the film Lady Bird about teenage friendship and complex, sometimes messy, female characters.

Doug Jones has made a career out of playing strange, otherworldly creatures. "I find the heart and soul of a character before I find his elbows and his hands," he says.

(Image credit: Courtesy of Fox Searchlight/Twentieth Century Fox)

Fred Rogers debuted on national public television in 1968 and quickly became known for his deliberate manner of relating to children. "Every one of us longs to be in touch with honesty," he once said.

(Image credit: Gene J. Puskar/AP)

The Dutch artist painted scores of self-portraits, but they weren't exactly flattering. Casting director Margery Simkin thinks he could have played the manager of a baseball team.

(Image credit: Ryan Miller/Capture Imaging/Courtesy of Norton Simon Museum)

Rhiannon Navin's Only Child, a novel about the aftermath of a school shooting came out shortly before a fatal school shooting in Florida. NPR's Michel Martin talks to Navin about overcoming tragedy.

(Image credit: Michael Lionstar)

The Bible's famous verse and chapter structure is relatively recent — and surprisingly unpopular. And a new version out now aims to make it more approachable by structuring it like any other book.

(Image credit: Jesse Tyler)

Fred Rogers' pioneering childrens' show debuted on Feb. 19, 1968. We look at what made the series different for its time and how Fred Rogers contributed to saving public broadcasting.

Kim Fu's new novel about a sleepaway camp sojourn that turns shattering for five young girls. But though the troubles seem tame — thirst and a lack of gummi bears — the horror comes later.

(Image credit: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt)

NPR's Michel Martin talks with prolific detective novelist Walter Mosley about his book, Down The River Unto The Sea, which takes on real world issues of policing, activism and criminal justice.

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Museum of Northwest Art

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The Museum of Northwest Art connects people with the art, diverse cultures and environments of the Northwest. 

 

COLLECTIONS

MoNA collects and exhibits contemporary art from across the Northwest, including Alaska, British Columbia, California, Idaho, Montana, Oregon and Washington.